Do you really need to buy uninsured motorist coverage?

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Being involved in an auto accident is no fun. But it’s doubly no fun if you’re hit by a driver who doesn’t have insurance and you don’t have an important type of insurance called uninsured motorist coverage.

Uninsured motorist coverage (and the closely related underinsured motorist coverage) exists to help pick up the tab when you’re in an accident with a driver who is at fault and either has only state minimums for liability or no coverage at all.

“When you buy auto insurance, it’s common that you’re looking to shave every dollar you can from the premium,” money expert Clark Howard says.

“So a lot of people buying auto insurance will ignore [uninsured motorist coverage,] which is actually one of the most important things for you to have as part of your policy.”

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at uninsured motorist coverage and why Clark says you really need to have it.

Uninsured motorist coverage: Table of contents

What does uninsured motorist coverage cover?
Who needs uninsured motorist coverage?
How much does uninsured motorist coverage cost?
A final thought on underinsured motorist coverage

What does uninsured motorist coverage cover?

First, it’s important to know that uninsured motorist coverage steps in to help in two scenarios:

When the motorist who hits you has no liability insurance
When the motorist who hits you is a hit-and-run driver
The protection it offers has two basic components. They are:

Bodily injury

Bodily injury coverage typically covers medical expenses, lost wages and injury-related expenses for you and your passengers if you’re in an accident with an uninsured driver and covers medical bills in hit-and-run accident situations.

Property damage

Property damage coverage typically covers damage to your vehicle cause by an uninsured driver and may protect your property in hit-and-run accidents in some cases. This varies from policy to policy.

Who needs uninsured motorist coverage?

Clark says it’s more likely that you’ll be hit by someone with liability coverage at state minimums, rather than by somebody with no insurance at all.

But that’s no cause for celebration.

“In most places, state minimums are not enough to deal with even a minor injury that someone may have,” Clark says.

The consumer champ notes that states have purposely kept their required minimums extremely low in an effort to make premiums more affordable. That way, more people will buy coverage instead of going without — in theory, at least.

Yet the problem is these low state minimums on liability aren’t nearly enough to pick up the tab when someone is hurt.

“If anybody has any meaningful injury, you’ll blow through that state minimum that the driver who hit you has in probably three hours in a hospital,” Clark says.

That’s why having uninsured motorist coverage is so important and why Clark recommends that every driver have it.

In fact, nearly half the states in the nation require motorists to carry it. However, the following states make uninsured motorist coverage optional, not mandatory:

Pennsylvania
Virginia
Delaware
New Jersey
Rhode Island
Tennessee
Kentucky
Indiana
Ohio
Michigan
Iowa
Arkansas
Louisiana
Mississippi
Alabama
Georgia
Florida
California
Nevada
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
Utah
Colorado
Arizona
New Mexico
Texas
Oklahoma
Washington

How much does uninsured motorist coverage cost?

While a number of factors can influence your the cost of your insurance policy, here’s a real-life policy illustration for a 2007 Hyundai Sonata in Georgia. This shows how much the coverage can cost under some circumstances:

 

The post Do you really need to buy uninsured motorist coverage? appeared first on INSURANCE.

Source: New feed

How to get a job without connections

You’ve heard the old adage a thousand times before, “it’s all about who you know.” Submitting a sleek, professional resume is obviously your first priority in the hunt for a new job, but employee referrals are the job hunter’s secret weapon. According to a recent study by Payscale, 41% of employees who landed a job because of a referral did so through family and friends and 32% got a referral from a business contact.

So, what do you do if you don’t have any inside connections? What if you’ve moved to a new city and your social circle is nonexistent at the moment? What if you’re fresh out of college and you didn’t network as well as you may have wanted? Don’t worry. Even when you don’t know anyone, getting a referral that lands you an interview is a lot easier than you think.

Message mutual friends on social media
Facebook is clearly the dominant social media outlet, and it’s likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future. As such, it’s a surprisingly great resource for finding employment leads. Your suggested friends’ list is a potential job referral gold mine. You can also use the search function on Facebook in clever ways to aid in your new career quest. Find individuals by the city they live in, where they went to school, which friends you both have in common, as well as where they work.

I suggest mixing and matching a few of these filters.

Start off with finding people that work at the company you’ve been eyeing, and also went to the same university as you.
Then transition to friends of friends that work where you’d like to apply.
If you come up empty-handed with either of those combinations, just search for people by workplace
The biggest hurdle with seeking job referrals, particularly if you’re an introvert, is reaching out to someone that you barely know. It seems intimidating (maybe even a bit rude) to message someone you’re unfamiliar with, but it’s actually in their benefit to have you brought onto the team. Many companies have lucrative referral programs that incentivize current employees to suggest new hires.

When striking up a conversation with someone you barely know or don’t know at all, remember not to jump head first into a sales pitch – be tactful. Break the ice by bringing up a commonality. Build a relationship before you solicit them for a job.

Scan their Facebook page and see what pages they follow, what music or movies they’re interested in, anything that will make the inevitable questioning about their work much more acceptable.

Open up with a message like this:

“Hey there, I saw that we both know [mutual friend]. I also noticed you’re into the same [musician, book, movie] as I am. That’s awesome, I love them! I don’t mean to bother you, but I was curious if you’d be interested in chatting for a bit about [company]? Whenever you’re available, of course. No rush. I was looking to apply there and I wanted to get your thoughts on a few things before I sent in my resume. I’d love to know what you thought about [album, novel, ending of movie] too! Thanks so much.”

Always be mindful of how aggressive you’re coming off. Your main goal is to build a bridge with a prospective colleague. If you don’t receive a response as quickly as you’d like, be patient and never be too pushy.

Reconnect with your university’s alumni network
University alumni networks aren’t just for reconnecting with old college flames or long-lost roommates, they’re an ideal resource for job referrals. College is, after all, your first major networking pool and reaching out to a fellow university alum is a lot more comfortable than, say, random Facebook users. You already share a common sense of identity. Think of your alma mater as an extended group of potential colleagues.

Many of these networks are designed with the specific purpose of helping students advance their careers. If you’re still in school, head to the career center on campus. They often maintain large databases of alumni information, so see if they’re able to get you in contact with recent graduates.

Scope out the university’s website and find the alumni section. In this digital age, colleges often utilize some form of external platform that you can log into. You should have access to these areas for a lengthy period of time after graduation, but it’s simple to sign back up if you’ve been out of school for a while.

Additionally, college career centers host job fairs and similar networking events that are open to the public. Consider attending one whether you live near your old school or you’re in a new city.

Scour Linkedin for employees
Hopefully, you’ve been diligently growing your LinkedIn network. If you haven’t, well then, open a new browser tab and either build your profile or start expanding your network immediately. LinkedIn is hands down your best chance at securing a job referral from someone that actually works in the career field your applying to. It’s perfect for when you absolutely, positively don’t know a single person that can refer you for a job.

Follow these steps:

Search LinkedIn for the job you want.
If you already have a profile, browse your first and second-degree connections.
Research what you can about the company and find someone currently employed there (either inside or outside your LinkedIn network).
Politely introduce yourself and try to set up a meeting over coffee or lunch
Ask specific questions related to their business.
Once you’ve found a contact in your industry, try and set up an “informational interview”. This is where you field questions about the nature of the company and their particular position. Not only will you gain valuable insight into the business, if you impress the contact well enough, you have an opportunity to be referred for the position you want.

You can be far more direct with your LinkedIn pitch as opposed to the Facebook example from earlier.

“Hello [LinkedIn Contact],

I’ve been following the work of [company] for some time now and I’m considering submitting my resume for [position]. If you have a moment, I was interested in asking a few questions regarding the application process. It would be great to get an insider’s perspective on [company product] as well. Were there any issues that arose with that project? Has it been successful? I appreciate your time. I look forward to finding out all that I can about [company].”

An added benefit of cold-emailing employees like this is that its good practice for when you finally reach the interview stage. Even if you aren’t able to set up a meeting, that person is likely to tell you how to get in touch with someone that can assist you. Ultimately, that’s what you’re trying to accomplish.

Join a meetup website
What’s better than a networking event? I know, you’re probably thinking anything is better than a networking event. However, there are a handful of websites out there that make networking much more tolerable.

These sites are perfect for chatting with professionals with inside information about your industry and meeting people that can refer you to recruiters:

Meetup – Perhaps the largest networking website out there. Meetup has a dedicated job search page to help you find business socials in your area
Eventbrite – Used by organizers to promote, plan, and even sell tickets (if necessary) to area events
Eventful – An online calendar and local event tracking website that includes a networking category
Reddit – The /r/meetups page on Reddit primarily organizes social networking events, but you never know who you might run into.
There are a few things to keep in mind when joining a networking website. Be wary of only mingling with other unemployed people. You’re there to find work and neither of you are in a position to help one another at the moment.

Events with low attendance can also be an issue, particularly if you’re in town with a small population. Try not to waste your time if it doesn’t seem worthwhile.

Avoid sites like Craigslist when looking for gainful employment. While it may help with an entry-level job search, you run the risk of being scammed. I once attended what I originally thought was a networking event which turned out to be a bizarre attempt to pitch multi-level marketing (read: pyramid scheme) to the few confused individuals that showed up.

Getting a job referral doesn’t have to be about who you know. It just takes a little initiative.

The post How to get a job without connections appeared first on Jobber lodge.

How to get a job without connections

You’ve heard the old adage a thousand times before, “it’s all about who you know.” Submitting a sleek, professional resume is obviously your first priority in the hunt for a new job, but employee referrals are the job hunter’s secret weapon. According to a recent study by Payscale, 41% of employees who landed a job because of a referral did so through family and friends and 32% got a referral from a business contact.

So, what do you do if you don’t have any inside connections? What if you’ve moved to a new city and your social circle is nonexistent at the moment? What if you’re fresh out of college and you didn’t network as well as you may have wanted? Don’t worry. Even when you don’t know anyone, getting a referral that lands you an interview is a lot easier than you think.

Message mutual friends on social media
Facebook is clearly the dominant social media outlet, and it’s likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future. As such, it’s a surprisingly great resource for finding employment leads. Your suggested friends’ list is a potential job referral gold mine. You can also use the search function on Facebook in clever ways to aid in your new career quest. Find individuals by the city they live in, where they went to school, which friends you both have in common, as well as where they work.

I suggest mixing and matching a few of these filters.

Start off with finding people that work at the company you’ve been eyeing, and also went to the same university as you.
Then transition to friends of friends that work where you’d like to apply.
If you come up empty-handed with either of those combinations, just search for people by workplace
The biggest hurdle with seeking job referrals, particularly if you’re an introvert, is reaching out to someone that you barely know. It seems intimidating (maybe even a bit rude) to message someone you’re unfamiliar with, but it’s actually in their benefit to have you brought onto the team. Many companies have lucrative referral programs that incentivize current employees to suggest new hires.

When striking up a conversation with someone you barely know or don’t know at all, remember not to jump head first into a sales pitch – be tactful. Break the ice by bringing up a commonality. Build a relationship before you solicit them for a job.

Scan their Facebook page and see what pages they follow, what music or movies they’re interested in, anything that will make the inevitable questioning about their work much more acceptable.

Open up with a message like this:

“Hey there, I saw that we both know [mutual friend]. I also noticed you’re into the same [musician, book, movie] as I am. That’s awesome, I love them! I don’t mean to bother you, but I was curious if you’d be interested in chatting for a bit about [company]? Whenever you’re available, of course. No rush. I was looking to apply there and I wanted to get your thoughts on a few things before I sent in my resume. I’d love to know what you thought about [album, novel, ending of movie] too! Thanks so much.”

Always be mindful of how aggressive you’re coming off. Your main goal is to build a bridge with a prospective colleague. If you don’t receive a response as quickly as you’d like, be patient and never be too pushy.

Reconnect with your university’s alumni network
University alumni networks aren’t just for reconnecting with old college flames or long-lost roommates, they’re an ideal resource for job referrals. College is, after all, your first major networking pool and reaching out to a fellow university alum is a lot more comfortable than, say, random Facebook users. You already share a common sense of identity. Think of your alma mater as an extended group of potential colleagues.

Many of these networks are designed with the specific purpose of helping students advance their careers. If you’re still in school, head to the career center on campus. They often maintain large databases of alumni information, so see if they’re able to get you in contact with recent graduates.

Scope out the university’s website and find the alumni section. In this digital age, colleges often utilize some form of external platform that you can log into. You should have access to these areas for a lengthy period of time after graduation, but it’s simple to sign back up if you’ve been out of school for a while.

Additionally, college career centers host job fairs and similar networking events that are open to the public. Consider attending one whether you live near your old school or you’re in a new city.

Scour Linkedin for employees
Hopefully, you’ve been diligently growing your LinkedIn network. If you haven’t, well then, open a new browser tab and either build your profile or start expanding your network immediately. LinkedIn is hands down your best chance at securing a job referral from someone that actually works in the career field your applying to. It’s perfect for when you absolutely, positively don’t know a single person that can refer you for a job.

Follow these steps:

Search LinkedIn for the job you want.
If you already have a profile, browse your first and second-degree connections.
Research what you can about the company and find someone currently employed there (either inside or outside your LinkedIn network).
Politely introduce yourself and try to set up a meeting over coffee or lunch
Ask specific questions related to their business.
Once you’ve found a contact in your industry, try and set up an “informational interview”. This is where you field questions about the nature of the company and their particular position. Not only will you gain valuable insight into the business, if you impress the contact well enough, you have an opportunity to be referred for the position you want.

You can be far more direct with your LinkedIn pitch as opposed to the Facebook example from earlier.

“Hello [LinkedIn Contact],

I’ve been following the work of [company] for some time now and I’m considering submitting my resume for [position]. If you have a moment, I was interested in asking a few questions regarding the application process. It would be great to get an insider’s perspective on [company product] as well. Were there any issues that arose with that project? Has it been successful? I appreciate your time. I look forward to finding out all that I can about [company].”

An added benefit of cold-emailing employees like this is that its good practice for when you finally reach the interview stage. Even if you aren’t able to set up a meeting, that person is likely to tell you how to get in touch with someone that can assist you. Ultimately, that’s what you’re trying to accomplish.

Join a meetup website
What’s better than a networking event? I know, you’re probably thinking anything is better than a networking event. However, there are a handful of websites out there that make networking much more tolerable.

These sites are perfect for chatting with professionals with inside information about your industry and meeting people that can refer you to recruiters:

Meetup – Perhaps the largest networking website out there. Meetup has a dedicated job search page to help you find business socials in your area
Eventbrite – Used by organizers to promote, plan, and even sell tickets (if necessary) to area events
Eventful – An online calendar and local event tracking website that includes a networking category
Reddit – The /r/meetups page on Reddit primarily organizes social networking events, but you never know who you might run into.
There are a few things to keep in mind when joining a networking website. Be wary of only mingling with other unemployed people. You’re there to find work and neither of you are in a position to help one another at the moment.

Events with low attendance can also be an issue, particularly if you’re in town with a small population. Try not to waste your time if it doesn’t seem worthwhile.

Avoid sites like Craigslist when looking for gainful employment. While it may help with an entry-level job search, you run the risk of being scammed. I once attended what I originally thought was a networking event which turned out to be a bizarre attempt to pitch multi-level marketing (read: pyramid scheme) to the few confused individuals that showed up.

Getting a job referral doesn’t have to be about who you know. It just takes a little initiative.

The post How to get a job without connections appeared first on Jobber lodge.

Source: New feed

Top 10 High-Paying Engineering Jobs in 2019

For those who are thinking of starting a career in engineering, you don’t have to look too far for inspiration. From the Tube train you took to work this morning to the machine that made your morning latte, right to the building you’re sitting in and the computer you’re reading this on right now, everything around you was designed, built and is maintained by engineers. In such an industrially and technologically advanced world, it’s likely that there is an industry and a discipline to suit everyone. But regardless of the field, the overall goal of engineering is the same: to innovate and develop solutions to society’s ever-shifting problems, no matter how large or small. As a result, engineering is one of the fastest growing and best-paid professions in the world. Whether you’re a graduate, an apprentice or an experienced hire, there is a broad array of fields to choose from. To help, we’ve compiled a handy list of the highest-paying ones! So read on, and find out where your skills could be best utilised!

10. Civil Engineer

Average salary: $83,540 (£63,570) (higher for chartered personnel) Aside from military engineering, this is the oldest engineering discipline in the world and is concerned with the building and maintenance of the built and natural environment. As a result, civil engineering is typically broken down into sub-disciplines, including:

Structural: Probably the most prominent type of civil engineering, it involves the structural design and analysis of buildings, bridges, towers, tunnels, flyovers, offshore structures and other manmade projects.
Construction: Deals with the planning and logistical side of building and construction work, and is more business-focused.
Environmental: Involves sanitary engineering, including hazardous waste management procedures and environmental remediation work.
Transportation: Involves designing, monitoring and building transportation routes, including roads, highways, railway systems, canals, airports, ports and mass transit systems.
Coastal: Similar to water resources engineering (which focuses more on inland water management such as dams), coastal engineering deals with erosion and water defences particularly in vulnerable areas such as the Netherlands and the southern US.
Although these are the more prominent areas, there are many other subspecialties, including municipal, surveying, plant, earthquake and forensic engineering. Civil engineers have a very unique skillset and, due to the commercial nature of their work, are often employed by recognisable global firms such as Aecom, Balfour Beatty and Laing O’Rourke.

9. Mechanical Engineer
Average salary: $84,190 (£64,060) Mechanical engineering is a very broad discipline and, at its core, is essentially the design and maintenance of anything that is composed of moving parts. It requires a strong understanding and comprehension of the following key areas:
mechanics
dynamics and thermodynamics
materials science
structural analysis
electricity
It is the most common area of engineering and, as such, it is applicable across all industries and fields on projects and operations of all shapes and sizes. As a result, mechanical engineers are highly employable by almost any large organisation that owns factories or manufacturing plants.

8. Industrial Engineer
Average salary: $84,310 (£64,150) In a world where businesses are constantly looking to optimise production and manufacturing costs, eliminate wastefulness, and comply with environmental obligations, industrial engineers can be worth their weight in gold. Tasked with identifying and implementing solutions to these problems, they combine data analysis with hands-on knowledge and awareness of on-the-ground practices, integrating machinery, people, materials and information into their processes. As a result, they need to be as adept in dealing with humans as they do anything mechanical.

7. Biomedical Engineer
Average salary: $85,620 (£65,150) Biomedical engineering is seen as the bridge between medicine and conventional engineering, utilising advances in biological science to develop machinery and tools that can help diagnose, monitor and treat medical conditions and injuries. There are many large biomed companies competing in this lucrative market such as Johnson & Johnson and the medical divisions of both Siemens and GE. Additionally, in the UK, there are biomed roles in the NHS.

6. Electrical Engineer

Average salary: $96,270 (£73,250) Unsurprisingly, electrical engineers are subject matter experts in all things electric, employing their finely tuned skills to a wide variety of industries, roles and locations. They can be responsible for designing and running power stations, developing commercial products or designing and implementing control systems. Basically, if there’s an AC current involved, then it’s likely that an electrical engineer will have had something to do with it. As a result, electrical engineers are employable in nearly every industry and, as technology advances, so too do their job and salary prospects.

5. Chemical Engineer

Average salary: $98,340 (£74,830) Although there is a demand in academia and research, chemical engineers typically work for commercial businesses who seek to transform chemicals, materials and energy sources into usable products such as plastics and other synthetics. As well as traditional engineering skills such as science and mathematics, the commercial nature of this job also demands a working knowledge of economics. There are many large multinational companies that specialise in chemical engineering, including BASF, DowDuPont and Sinopec.

4. Software Engineer
Average salary: $100,080 (£76,160) Software engineers write, test, implement and update the software code that is used by computers, applications and other digital platforms; as a result, it’s important to possess excellent programming skills as well as an aptitude for problem solving. As we move further into the digital age, software engineer numbers are increasing year-on-year, and it is predicted to be one of the most common and important jobs of the near future. Although any company that runs its own databases requires software engineers, they form the core working body of many innovative tech giants such as Apple, Google and Facebook.

3. Computer / Hardware Engineer
Average salary: $102,280 (£77,830) Hardware engineering (not to be confused with software engineering) is a combination of electrical engineering and computer science and is used to build the components that are used in computers, network systems and other commercial products. As our world becomes increasingly digital, computer engineering is emerging as a sought-after and highly valued profession. As an added bonus, many of the companies who are seeking these skills, such as Dell, Intel and Microsoft, are often named among the top companies to work for.

2. Aerospace Engineer
Average salary: $109,650 (£83,440) In a nutshell, aerospace engineering is concerned with the development and maintenance of either aircraft (aeronautical) or spacecraft (astronautical). Due to its complex nature (it’s literally rocket science, after all), it’s usually broken down and divided into further engineering sub-disciplines such as avionics, aerodynamics and propulsion. Most of the large aircraft manufacturers, such as Boeing and Airbus, offer positions directly, although it is also possible to work for part-specific companies such as GE or Rolls-Royce (who build engines). Many engineers also choose to pursue careers with NASA in the US or the European Space Agency (ESA) in the UK.

1. Petroleum Engineer
Average salary: $128,230 (£97,580) The discovery and recovery of natural oil resources is perhaps the most lucrative business enterprise in the world. And in such a high-stakes industry, energy companies rely primarily on the expertise of petroleum engineers – experts on the physical behaviour of water, oil and gas – to give them the edge. Their knowledge can identify and estimate the suitability of potential drilling sites. As a result, petroleum engineers are compensated handsomely by the global energy companies that hire them, including as Sinopec, ExxonMobil and Gazprom. As you can see, careers in engineering are enormously varied, with the opportunity to work in some fascinating fields and truly make a difference in the way we live. They are also very well paid – especially in the energy and IT sectors, which society is becoming ever reliant on. So, if you are technically minded and looking for a new career in 2019, then why not consider engineering?

 

Which engineering field do you want to work in? Let us know in the comments below.

The post Top 10 High-Paying Engineering Jobs in 2019 appeared first on Jobber lodge.

Top 10 High-Paying Engineering Jobs in 2019

For those who are thinking of starting a career in engineering, you don’t have to look too far for inspiration. From the Tube train you took to work this morning to the machine that made your morning latte, right to the building you’re sitting in and the computer you’re reading this on right now, everything around you was designed, built and is maintained by engineers. In such an industrially and technologically advanced world, it’s likely that there is an industry and a discipline to suit everyone. But regardless of the field, the overall goal of engineering is the same: to innovate and develop solutions to society’s ever-shifting problems, no matter how large or small. As a result, engineering is one of the fastest growing and best-paid professions in the world. Whether you’re a graduate, an apprentice or an experienced hire, there is a broad array of fields to choose from. To help, we’ve compiled a handy list of the highest-paying ones! So read on, and find out where your skills could be best utilised!

10. Civil Engineer

Average salary: $83,540 (£63,570) (higher for chartered personnel) Aside from military engineering, this is the oldest engineering discipline in the world and is concerned with the building and maintenance of the built and natural environment. As a result, civil engineering is typically broken down into sub-disciplines, including:

Structural: Probably the most prominent type of civil engineering, it involves the structural design and analysis of buildings, bridges, towers, tunnels, flyovers, offshore structures and other manmade projects.
Construction: Deals with the planning and logistical side of building and construction work, and is more business-focused.
Environmental: Involves sanitary engineering, including hazardous waste management procedures and environmental remediation work.
Transportation: Involves designing, monitoring and building transportation routes, including roads, highways, railway systems, canals, airports, ports and mass transit systems.
Coastal: Similar to water resources engineering (which focuses more on inland water management such as dams), coastal engineering deals with erosion and water defences particularly in vulnerable areas such as the Netherlands and the southern US.
Although these are the more prominent areas, there are many other subspecialties, including municipal, surveying, plant, earthquake and forensic engineering. Civil engineers have a very unique skillset and, due to the commercial nature of their work, are often employed by recognisable global firms such as Aecom, Balfour Beatty and Laing O’Rourke.

9. Mechanical Engineer
Average salary: $84,190 (£64,060) Mechanical engineering is a very broad discipline and, at its core, is essentially the design and maintenance of anything that is composed of moving parts. It requires a strong understanding and comprehension of the following key areas:
mechanics
dynamics and thermodynamics
materials science
structural analysis
electricity
It is the most common area of engineering and, as such, it is applicable across all industries and fields on projects and operations of all shapes and sizes. As a result, mechanical engineers are highly employable by almost any large organisation that owns factories or manufacturing plants.

8. Industrial Engineer
Average salary: $84,310 (£64,150) In a world where businesses are constantly looking to optimise production and manufacturing costs, eliminate wastefulness, and comply with environmental obligations, industrial engineers can be worth their weight in gold. Tasked with identifying and implementing solutions to these problems, they combine data analysis with hands-on knowledge and awareness of on-the-ground practices, integrating machinery, people, materials and information into their processes. As a result, they need to be as adept in dealing with humans as they do anything mechanical.

7. Biomedical Engineer
Average salary: $85,620 (£65,150) Biomedical engineering is seen as the bridge between medicine and conventional engineering, utilising advances in biological science to develop machinery and tools that can help diagnose, monitor and treat medical conditions and injuries. There are many large biomed companies competing in this lucrative market such as Johnson & Johnson and the medical divisions of both Siemens and GE. Additionally, in the UK, there are biomed roles in the NHS.

6. Electrical Engineer

Average salary: $96,270 (£73,250) Unsurprisingly, electrical engineers are subject matter experts in all things electric, employing their finely tuned skills to a wide variety of industries, roles and locations. They can be responsible for designing and running power stations, developing commercial products or designing and implementing control systems. Basically, if there’s an AC current involved, then it’s likely that an electrical engineer will have had something to do with it. As a result, electrical engineers are employable in nearly every industry and, as technology advances, so too do their job and salary prospects.

5. Chemical Engineer

Average salary: $98,340 (£74,830) Although there is a demand in academia and research, chemical engineers typically work for commercial businesses who seek to transform chemicals, materials and energy sources into usable products such as plastics and other synthetics. As well as traditional engineering skills such as science and mathematics, the commercial nature of this job also demands a working knowledge of economics. There are many large multinational companies that specialise in chemical engineering, including BASF, DowDuPont and Sinopec.

4. Software Engineer
Average salary: $100,080 (£76,160) Software engineers write, test, implement and update the software code that is used by computers, applications and other digital platforms; as a result, it’s important to possess excellent programming skills as well as an aptitude for problem solving. As we move further into the digital age, software engineer numbers are increasing year-on-year, and it is predicted to be one of the most common and important jobs of the near future. Although any company that runs its own databases requires software engineers, they form the core working body of many innovative tech giants such as Apple, Google and Facebook.

3. Computer / Hardware Engineer
Average salary: $102,280 (£77,830) Hardware engineering (not to be confused with software engineering) is a combination of electrical engineering and computer science and is used to build the components that are used in computers, network systems and other commercial products. As our world becomes increasingly digital, computer engineering is emerging as a sought-after and highly valued profession. As an added bonus, many of the companies who are seeking these skills, such as Dell, Intel and Microsoft, are often named among the top companies to work for.

2. Aerospace Engineer
Average salary: $109,650 (£83,440) In a nutshell, aerospace engineering is concerned with the development and maintenance of either aircraft (aeronautical) or spacecraft (astronautical). Due to its complex nature (it’s literally rocket science, after all), it’s usually broken down and divided into further engineering sub-disciplines such as avionics, aerodynamics and propulsion. Most of the large aircraft manufacturers, such as Boeing and Airbus, offer positions directly, although it is also possible to work for part-specific companies such as GE or Rolls-Royce (who build engines). Many engineers also choose to pursue careers with NASA in the US or the European Space Agency (ESA) in the UK.

1. Petroleum Engineer
Average salary: $128,230 (£97,580) The discovery and recovery of natural oil resources is perhaps the most lucrative business enterprise in the world. And in such a high-stakes industry, energy companies rely primarily on the expertise of petroleum engineers – experts on the physical behaviour of water, oil and gas – to give them the edge. Their knowledge can identify and estimate the suitability of potential drilling sites. As a result, petroleum engineers are compensated handsomely by the global energy companies that hire them, including as Sinopec, ExxonMobil and Gazprom. As you can see, careers in engineering are enormously varied, with the opportunity to work in some fascinating fields and truly make a difference in the way we live. They are also very well paid – especially in the energy and IT sectors, which society is becoming ever reliant on. So, if you are technically minded and looking for a new career in 2019, then why not consider engineering?

 

Which engineering field do you want to work in? Let us know in the comments below.

The post Top 10 High-Paying Engineering Jobs in 2019 appeared first on Jobber lodge.

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Top Six Tips for Landing Your Dream Job

Do you have a job that’s just like everyone else’s? Are you looking for a 9-to-5, but wish you weren’t? Do you wish there was another option, one that would lead to an exciting, unique and fulfilling line of work?

I recently interviewed more than 100 people who currently hold their dream jobs as research for a new book called How’d You Score That Gig? These individuals, who are travel journalists, event planners, fashion designers, forensic scientists, interior decorators, Internet business owners and more, have one thing in common — persistence.

As unattainable as a dream job might sound, with the right amount of forethought and preparation, you can make the move as well. Following are six tips to get you started.

Learn About Yourself

Take time to do a self-assessment of your values, how you like to work and what you’d be compelled to do even if you never got paid. Research careers and industries that map to your skills and interests. Hit the Internet, set up informational interviews, take relevant coursework and arrange to go onsite at a company in your chosen field.

Don’t Be Deterred by a Lack of Experience

In developing a resume and other promotional materials for the field you want to pursue, think about how your current skills and talents apply to the responsibilities you’ll hold in the new job. For example, knowledge of project management, client relations, information technology and sales will take you far in most types of careers.

Ease Into a New Career One Foot at a Time

Perhaps this means earning a paycheck at your current job while doing a part-time internship in your new field, or taking an adult-education class or workshop on the weekend. The only way to find out if you’re passionate about something is to try it — ideally with as little risk as you can manage.

Remember That Any Progress Is Good Progress

Even confident people stay in unsatisfying jobs because they feel safe, and because they’re afraid of making a bad decision. But in the quest to uncover a source of meaningful work, though, your worst enemy is inertia. Make an effort to do one thing — like emailing a networking contact or attending an event — that moves you a bit closer to your big-picture goal.

Start Early

Twenty- and thirty-somethings have more flexibility when it comes to test-driving different careers. The process of self-discovery is much easier when you’re unencumbered by family responsibilities and substantial financial burdens, and when you haven’t yet reached a level in a career where it’s tougher to turn back. That said, it’s never too late to pursue your passion. More and more Baby Boomers are leaving the world of traditional employment for alternative career paths that will fulfill them well into retirement age.

Have Realistic Expectations

Even if you’re lucky enough to hold your dream job, there’s no such thing as the perfect work situation. Every job has its ups and downs, and aspects we love and aspects we don’t love. And “dream job” doesn’t mean “cushy job.” As your mom always told you, anything worth having in this world requires some effort. There will be some days you feel like shutting the alarm off and going back to sleep, but many more where you feel more energized by the prospect of work than you ever thought possible.

The post Top Six Tips for Landing Your Dream Job appeared first on Jobber lodge.

Top Six Tips for Landing Your Dream Job

Do you have a job that’s just like everyone else’s? Are you looking for a 9-to-5, but wish you weren’t? Do you wish there was another option, one that would lead to an exciting, unique and fulfilling line of work?

I recently interviewed more than 100 people who currently hold their dream jobs as research for a new book called How’d You Score That Gig? These individuals, who are travel journalists, event planners, fashion designers, forensic scientists, interior decorators, Internet business owners and more, have one thing in common — persistence.

As unattainable as a dream job might sound, with the right amount of forethought and preparation, you can make the move as well. Following are six tips to get you started.

Learn About Yourself

Take time to do a self-assessment of your values, how you like to work and what you’d be compelled to do even if you never got paid. Research careers and industries that map to your skills and interests. Hit the Internet, set up informational interviews, take relevant coursework and arrange to go onsite at a company in your chosen field.

Don’t Be Deterred by a Lack of Experience

In developing a resume and other promotional materials for the field you want to pursue, think about how your current skills and talents apply to the responsibilities you’ll hold in the new job. For example, knowledge of project management, client relations, information technology and sales will take you far in most types of careers.

Ease Into a New Career One Foot at a Time

Perhaps this means earning a paycheck at your current job while doing a part-time internship in your new field, or taking an adult-education class or workshop on the weekend. The only way to find out if you’re passionate about something is to try it — ideally with as little risk as you can manage.

Remember That Any Progress Is Good Progress

Even confident people stay in unsatisfying jobs because they feel safe, and because they’re afraid of making a bad decision. But in the quest to uncover a source of meaningful work, though, your worst enemy is inertia. Make an effort to do one thing — like emailing a networking contact or attending an event — that moves you a bit closer to your big-picture goal.

Start Early

Twenty- and thirty-somethings have more flexibility when it comes to test-driving different careers. The process of self-discovery is much easier when you’re unencumbered by family responsibilities and substantial financial burdens, and when you haven’t yet reached a level in a career where it’s tougher to turn back. That said, it’s never too late to pursue your passion. More and more Baby Boomers are leaving the world of traditional employment for alternative career paths that will fulfill them well into retirement age.

Have Realistic Expectations

Even if you’re lucky enough to hold your dream job, there’s no such thing as the perfect work situation. Every job has its ups and downs, and aspects we love and aspects we don’t love. And “dream job” doesn’t mean “cushy job.” As your mom always told you, anything worth having in this world requires some effort. There will be some days you feel like shutting the alarm off and going back to sleep, but many more where you feel more energized by the prospect of work than you ever thought possible.

The post Top Six Tips for Landing Your Dream Job appeared first on Jobber lodge.

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The 10 high-paying Medical jobs in America 2019

Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we found the 10 occupations in America with the highest mean annual salaries.
Medical occupations dominate the top of the list.
If you want to make a lot of money in your career, a medical occupation may be right for you.

Here are the 10 highest-paying jobs in America, along with their mean annual salary, estimated number of people employed in each occupation as of May 2019, and, where available, a brief description of the occupation from the Labor Department’s O*NET occupational database .

 

10. General internists

Average annual salary: $198,370

Number of people employed: 42,280

What they do: Physicians who diagnose and provide non-surgical treatment of diseases and injuries of internal organ systems.

9. Dentists, all other specialists

Average annual salary: $199,980

Number of people employed: 4,590

What they do: Various dental specializations.

8. Family and general practitioners

Average annual salary: $208,560

Number of people employed: 126,440

What they do: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population.

7. Physicians and surgeons, all other

Average annual salary: $211,390

Number of people employed: 355,460

What they do: Various medical specialties.

6. Psychiatrists

Average annual salary: $216,090

Number of people employed: 25,250

What they do: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent disorders of the mind.

5. Orthodontists

Average annual salary: $229,380

Number of people employed: 5,080

What they do: Examine, diagnose, and treat dental malocclusions and oral cavity anomalies.

4. Obstetricians and gynecologists

Average annual salary: $235,240

Number of people employed: 18,880

What they do: Physicians who provide medical care related to pregnancy or childbirth and those who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases of women.

3. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons

Average annual salary: $242,740

Number of people employed: 4,800

What they do: Perform surgery and related procedures on the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial regions.

2. Surgeons

Average annual salary: $251,890

Number of people employed: 38,600

What they do: Physicians who treat diseases, injuries, and deformities by invasive, minimally invasive, or non-invasive surgical methods.

1. Anesthesiologists

Average annual salary: $265,990

Number of people employed: 30,590

What they do: Physicians who administer anesthetics prior to, during, or after surgery or other medical procedures.

The post The 10 high-paying Medical jobs in America 2019 appeared first on Jobber lodge.

The 10 high-paying Medical jobs in America 2019

Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we found the 10 occupations in America with the highest mean annual salaries.
Medical occupations dominate the top of the list.
If you want to make a lot of money in your career, a medical occupation may be right for you.

Here are the 10 highest-paying jobs in America, along with their mean annual salary, estimated number of people employed in each occupation as of May 2019, and, where available, a brief description of the occupation from the Labor Department’s O*NET occupational database .

 

10. General internists

Average annual salary: $198,370

Number of people employed: 42,280

What they do: Physicians who diagnose and provide non-surgical treatment of diseases and injuries of internal organ systems.

9. Dentists, all other specialists

Average annual salary: $199,980

Number of people employed: 4,590

What they do: Various dental specializations.

8. Family and general practitioners

Average annual salary: $208,560

Number of people employed: 126,440

What they do: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population.

7. Physicians and surgeons, all other

Average annual salary: $211,390

Number of people employed: 355,460

What they do: Various medical specialties.

6. Psychiatrists

Average annual salary: $216,090

Number of people employed: 25,250

What they do: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent disorders of the mind.

5. Orthodontists

Average annual salary: $229,380

Number of people employed: 5,080

What they do: Examine, diagnose, and treat dental malocclusions and oral cavity anomalies.

4. Obstetricians and gynecologists

Average annual salary: $235,240

Number of people employed: 18,880

What they do: Physicians who provide medical care related to pregnancy or childbirth and those who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases of women.

3. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons

Average annual salary: $242,740

Number of people employed: 4,800

What they do: Perform surgery and related procedures on the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial regions.

2. Surgeons

Average annual salary: $251,890

Number of people employed: 38,600

What they do: Physicians who treat diseases, injuries, and deformities by invasive, minimally invasive, or non-invasive surgical methods.

1. Anesthesiologists

Average annual salary: $265,990

Number of people employed: 30,590

What they do: Physicians who administer anesthetics prior to, during, or after surgery or other medical procedures.

The post The 10 high-paying Medical jobs in America 2019 appeared first on Jobber lodge.

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9 Top Ways to Find Your Dream Job

The first and most important aspect to getting anything you want is knowing what you want. If you don’t really know what your dream job is, you will never find it. Many literal dreams are chaotic splices of our lives. Things that we partially understand and things that we want to know more about because they excite us show up as manifestations in our dreams.

To get the job of your dreams you need to sort through the clutter and focus on realistic goals. Some of the following methods will help you get the job you want.

1. Find your dream job by focusing

The idea here is taking your love of something (for example, communication) and focusing it on a specific career path (for example, reporting the T.V. news). This focus allows you to distinguish the difference between earning a degree and going after specific opportunities. Every year hundreds and thousands of students complete undergraduate degrees in fields like communication without really having thought about what their dream job would be. That focus will help you get your dream job because you will be in a better position to pursue your dream.

2. Earn your dream job because you can do it

By today’s standards, a degree doesn’t necessarily qualify you to do anything! Just because you studied programming in college doesn’t mean you can program a VCR (remember those?). You shouldn’t wait until you finish school to start doing what you love. Create your own video game if you want to get a job (or even an internship) as a programmer. Want that dream job of being a news reporter? Join CNN iReport or start your own blog where you report local news.

3. Get an internship to gain experience

Just like the idea of doing whatever it is that you love, you can often pursue your dream job through the college or university where you are obtaining your education. If you want to be a writer or a radio disc jockey, chances are that your school has media outlets where you can intern and gain experience while building your resume. Everything from student teaching to volunteering in a research lab is available while you study the academics of your major.

4. Find the job you want through confidence

Having education and experience isn’t the same as having confidence. When you learn how to do something and then you practice, you build confidence, and that will help you get the job you want. Your dream job is likely to be in a competitive field. If you want it, chances are someone else will too. Having the confidence to stand behind your qualifications will help you get your foot in the door.

5. Take your confidence to nonverbal communication

When you finally land an interview at the job you want, make sure your nervousness doesn’t get in the way of how you communicate without words. When you cross your arms you could simply be cold, but this sends a nonverbal statement that you are closed off or less approachable. Take care to communicate a friendly, open and easy-to-get-along-with attitude.

6. Be the solution to a problem

Often we think specifically in terms of what we want, what our dream job is, or how to pursue our objectives that we forget the fact that getting a job means someone chooses to pay you to solve a problem, or to fill a need in a company. Whether you want to be an elementary school teacher or a linebacker, your job will have a purpose and you will be the best person to solve the problem.

7. You don’t have to be perfect

Not only do you not have to be perfect, but also you have to remember that no job is perfect. What may seem like a dream job may not be the right fit for you for many different reasons. Remember while you search that stressing about little details will only hurt your chances. Stay confident.

8. Research the company

As mentioned above, no job is perfect and while you may be the perfect fit for the job you want, you’ll never know without doing research on the company. The hiring manager will do his or her homework on you and your skills, so why not do your own background check? Make sure you look at the company’s history as well as its work to see just how you will fit.

9. Make job hunting your job

Believe it or not, job hunting can be a full-time job. You want to put a lot of work into crafting your cover letter, formatting your resume and communicating in person. Make sure that you schedule time to work on each aspect. Take breaks and make sure to engage in stress-relieving activities. If you’re too stressed about getting a job, you will not enjoy the process as much.

10. Be on the radar

Before you finish school, and before you complete your first internship, you can and should network socially with companies you might want to work for. Social media makes this not only possible, but also necessary. LinkedIn is more than a place to house your online resume. Through joining groups, posting blogs, and sharing your thoughts on your chosen industry, you can be on the radar. Quite often, a company will reach out to the people on its radar before beginning the interview process formally.

The post 9 Top Ways to Find Your Dream Job appeared first on Jobber lodge.